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Alyra Biotech is an Australian company exclusively focussed on improving the management of pain and wellbeing in women. They want to ask about your views on intrauterine contraceptive devices, even if you've never used one.
If you have used one they would like to know about what went well for you and what didn't.
You can help in the design of new intrauterine contraceptive devices that may suit women with specific health needs. Your experience matters! Follow the link.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/H6L6L9K
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Alyra Biotech is an Australian company exclusively focussed on improving the management of pain and wellbeing in women.  They want to ask about your views on intrauterine contraceptive devices, even if youve never used one.
If you have used one they would like to know about what went well for you and what didnt. 
You can help in the design of new intrauterine contraceptive devices that may suit women with specific health needs.  Your experience matters!  Follow the link.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/H6L6L9K

Comment on Facebook

Thanks so much EndoActive. We’re doing our best to design an IUCD to suit women with pain and we want to hear what they like and what don’t like. To help us make positive change.

I tried so many different forms of female contraception but to no avail from relief of the Endo pain I suffered from since the age of 12. Nothing worked. Was told I was basically infertile due to my Endometriosis, fell pregnant at 34, had my son at 35 and suffered even more Endometriosis issues after my son's birth. Partial hysterectomy at 38 but because I still have my ovaries I suffer from Endometriosis pain to this day at the age of 49. Blessed to have my almost 14year old son.

Charlie Chang have you had a chance to have your say yet??

We hope you're having a pain-free stress free easter break.
We know that sometimes it must seem as if nothing much is happening on the endo research scene - but there is heaps chugging away in the background. So we wonder if you would assist the endo community by sharing your opinion on intrauterine devices? Please like and share. 🥰
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We hope youre having a pain-free stress free easter break.  
We know that sometimes it must seem as if nothing much is happening on the endo research scene - but there is heaps chugging away in the background. So we wonder if you would assist the endo community by sharing your opinion on intrauterine devices?  Please like and share. 🥰

Comment on Facebook

Great stuff ! ❤️

Charlie Chang you should share your feedback

I would absolutely not consider it. My gyno suggested Mirena, I did some research and found there there were 50,000 lawsuits against the manufacturer Bayer in the US for 'side effects' including intense headaches and abdominal pain as well as Perforation of organs including the uterus. Terrified me. www.drugwatch.com/mirena/lawsuits/

There was a time not so long ago when endometriosis was never mentioned in public let alone in a film!
END-O is a free film you can watch on-line - a warmhearted comedy about two young women with endometriosis.
Here is the link:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nL91LegtUWk» Subscribe for the world's best short films: http://sub2.omele.to»; Get some merch: http://shop.omele.toEnd-O is used with permission from Alice Seabright. L...
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Video image

Comment on Facebook

Nicolle has promoted action for endometriosis for years. Brilliant ❤️

Nicolle Flint Member for Boothby
March is Endometriosis Awareness Month.

The month aims to raise awareness and educate the public on this important women's health issue, while raising funds for endometriosis research.

This week in Parliament I wanted to highlight some incredible groups who do so much to support women with endo, including:

EndoActive Australia & NZ
Endometriosis Australia
QENDO
Pelvic Pain Foundation of Australia
Endo Perth Sisters
Endometriosis Western Australia

These groups provide the most amazing support. To any woman suffering with endometriosis, there are people out there to help you, please get the help that you need.
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Comment on Facebook

Suse

Charlie Chang issue made it to Parliament

The pain of endometriosis may be relieved by medicinal cannabis. You could take part in a new study from CA Clinics. You need to be over 18 and living in Australia to be eligible to volunteer. Your participation may contribute to the development of better treatment for endometriosis. For more information contact CA clinics on 1300991477 or info@caclinics.com.au
#womenshealthcare
#endometriosisawareness
#endometriosis
#endometriosisstudy
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The pain of endometriosis may be relieved by medicinal cannabis.  You could take part in a new study from CA Clinics. You need to be over 18 and living in Australia to be eligible to volunteer. Your participation may contribute to the development of better treatment for endometriosis.  For more information contact CA clinics on 1300991477 or info@caclinics.com.au 
#womenshealthcare
#endometriosisawareness
#endometriosis
#endometriosisstudy

Comment on Facebook

Tara interesting !

Jessica Hirst

Harley Rutherford

Mine was removed by an hysterectomy. Best thing I ever did.

Rhi Bryan

Meagan Miller

FIVE MYTHS ABOUT ENDO:
Here is an article from Harvard Medical School
by Kelly Bilodeau, exec editor of Harvard Women's Health Watch.

5 myths — and the facts — about endometriosis:

Myth 1: The symptoms are just a heavy period. Women with endometriosis sometimes assume that their symptoms are a normal part of menstruation, and when they do seek help they are sometimes dismissed as overreacting to normal menstrual symptoms. But in fact, something much more serious is going on than period cramps. One theory is that the pain occurs because even when endometrium-like tissue is outside the uterus, it continues to respond to hormonal signals and produce chemicals that cause inflammation and pain.

During the course of the menstrual cycle, this endometrium-like tissue thickens and eventually bleeds. But unlike endometrial tissue in the uterus, which is able to drain through the vagina each month, blood from displaced tissue has nowhere to go. Instead, it pools near the affected organs and tissues, irritating and inflaming them. The result is pain, and sometimes the development of scar tissue that can form a web, fusing organs together. This may lead to pain with movement or sexual activity.

Myth 2: Endometriosis only affects the pelvic region. The most common locations for endometriosis growths to occur are within the pelvis, such as on the outer surface of the uterus, the bladder, and the fallopian tubes. But endometriosis may occur anywhere in the body. Rarely, endometrium-like tissue has been found in the lungs, for example.

Myth 3: Endometriosis is always painful. Not everyone with endometriosis experiences pain. It’s not uncommon for a woman to learn she has endometriosis only after she begins investigating why she is having difficulty getting pregnant. Endometriosis is the leading cause of infertility in the United States. Having the condition also increases the likelihood of miscarriage and other problems in pregnancy. However, the good news is that the vast majority of women with endometriosis are ultimately able to have a child.

Myth 4: Endometriosis can be prevented. There’s no clearly understood cause for endometriosis, so at this point there is no known way to prevent it. Certain steps to help lower oestrogen levels in the body can reduce your risk, according to the US Office of Women’s Health. Oestrogen can fuel the growth of endometriosis and magnify symptoms. You can reduce your oestrogen levels by choosing a lower-oestrogen birth control method, losing weight if you are overweight, and getting regular exercise.

Myth 5: Endometriosis always improves after menopause. Although endometriosis symptoms occur most often during menstruation, for some women they last well after monthly cycles end. Even after a woman goes through menopause, the ovaries continue to produce small amounts of estrogen. Endometriosis growths may continue to respond to the hormone, causing pain. So, while symptoms of endometriosis improve in many women, menopause doesn’t bring relief to all. Some women who have gone through menopause may opt for surgical procedures to remove endometriosis implants or adhesions, or even hysterectomy and oophorectomy (removing the ovaries). However, these procedures are not always successful in controlling pain. Hormonal therapies, too, appear to be less effective in women after menopause.
... See MoreSee Less

FIVE MYTHS ABOUT ENDO:
Here is an article from Harvard Medical School
by Kelly Bilodeau, exec editor of Harvard Womens Health Watch.
5 myths — and the facts — about endometriosis:
Myth 1: The symptoms are just a heavy period. Women with endometriosis sometimes assume that their symptoms are a normal part of menstruation, and when they do seek help they are sometimes dismissed as overreacting to normal menstrual symptoms. But in fact, something much more serious is going on than period cramps. One theory is that the pain occurs because even when endometrium-like tissue is outside the uterus, it continues to respond to hormonal signals and produce chemicals that cause inflammation and pain.
During the course of the menstrual cycle, this endometrium-like tissue thickens and eventually bleeds. But unlike endometrial tissue in the uterus, which is able to drain through the vagina each month, blood from displaced tissue has nowhere to go. Instead, it pools near the affected organs and tissues, irritating and inflaming them. The result is pain, and sometimes the development of scar tissue that can form a web, fusing organs together. This may lead to pain with movement or sexual activity.
Myth 2: Endometriosis only affects the pelvic region. The most common locations for endometriosis growths to occur are within the pelvis, such as on the outer surface of the uterus, the bladder, and the fallopian tubes. But endometriosis may occur anywhere in the body. Rarely, endometrium-like tissue has been found in the lungs, for example.
Myth 3: Endometriosis is always painful. Not everyone with endometriosis experiences pain. It’s not uncommon for a woman to learn she has endometriosis only after she begins investigating why she is having difficulty getting pregnant. Endometriosis is the leading cause of infertility in the United States. Having the condition also increases the likelihood of miscarriage and other problems in pregnancy. However, the good news is that the vast majority of women with endometriosis are ultimately able to have a child.
Myth 4: Endometriosis can be prevented. There’s no clearly understood cause for endometriosis, so at this point there is no known way to prevent it. Certain steps to help lower oestrogen levels in the body can reduce your risk, according to the US Office of Women’s Health. Oestrogen can fuel the growth of endometriosis and magnify symptoms. You can reduce your oestrogen levels by choosing a lower-oestrogen birth control method, losing weight if you are overweight, and getting regular exercise.
Myth 5: Endometriosis always improves after menopause. Although endometriosis symptoms occur most often during menstruation, for some women they last well after monthly cycles end. Even after a woman goes through menopause, the ovaries continue to produce small amounts of estrogen. Endometriosis growths may continue to respond to the hormone, causing pain. So, while symptoms of endometriosis improve in many women, menopause doesn’t bring relief to all. Some women who have gone through menopause may opt for surgical procedures to remove endometriosis implants or adhesions, or even hysterectomy and oophorectomy (removing the ovaries). However, these procedures are not always successful in controlling pain. Hormonal therapies, too, appear to be less effective in women after menopause.

Comment on Facebook

Excellent, very important, indeed there are many myths and misconceptions around the disease. Well done on the post. Avivit Israel

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